Be Empowered

When a person is newly diagnosed with epilepsy there is an adjustment period. Questions are asked, “Why me?”, and a whole range of emotions can be displayed from denial, sadness, grief, or anger. These in turn can affect self-esteem: a person can become fearful of his/her condition, anxious, embarrassed, or even angry. Relationships can suffer, employment potential can be compromised and a person’s ability to

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Safety in the Home

Keeping Safe – Living with Epilepsy The home is the most common place for seizure-related accidents, followed by street and workplace accidents. The following information is designed to help identify the most appropriate safety measures for you. In the bedroom Have a low bed Don’t place the bed against the wall or near other furniture Place protective cushions around the bed Pad sharp-edged furniture Use

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My seizure diary

A seizure diary is an important tool to manage, record and keep track of seizures and epilepsy.  It can be used to keep track of medications, side effects, seizure frequency and for help in identifying potential triggers. We worked together with Seizure Support Northland to develop an easy to use and in depth seizure diary. Please contact Maria if you would like to receive a free copy.

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Epilepsy Medication

Epilepsy seizures can be controlled (but not cured) by the use of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Around 70% of people become seizure-free, or have the number of their seizures decreased, with AED use. Most people find the right AED fairly quickly once newly diagnosed. These drugs calm the over-excited brain cells by affecting the levels of ‘neurotransmitter’ chemicals in the brain. They do not work at

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Children and Epilepsy

Epilepsy affects 1 in 100 people, and most have their first seizure in childhood. The largest group of people with epilepsy is children under the age of five (see “What is epilepsy?” fact sheet). There are many types of seizures with varying degrees of severity. Some types of childhood seizures are benign (the child grows out of them and his/her development and intellect are usually normal).

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What to do if someone is having a convulsive seizure

Stay calm Make the person safe Cushion the head Time the seizure Look for ID on the person Don’t hold them down Put nothing in the mouth When the seizure ends, place the person in the recovery position (see below) Stay with the person until he/she has fully recovered. There is no need to call an ambulance (111) unless: The seizure lasts longer than 5

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The Brain

The brain is the key part of the central nervous system that controls our entire body. It controls our breathing, our beating heart, our ability to use our senses, how we receive and gather information, and even our behaviour and personality. The brain has 100 billion brain nerve cells (neurons). These cells communicate with one another and to other parts of the body by sending

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Epilepsy Types

There are different types of seizures. Some affect a part of the brain (focal) and others affect the whole brain (generalized). The first aid required for each seizure type is dependent on what is happening in the brain at the time of a seizure. 1. Focal Seizures (Affecting a specific part of the brain)   Do not try to stop the seizure. Guide the person away

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What is epilepsy?

Epilepsy is: A tendency to experience recurrent, unprovoked seizures. A seizure occurs when neurons send abnormal electrochemical signals to the brain; such signals result in an alteration in sensation, behaviour, and consciousness. One of the most common neurological conditions, affecting one in 100 people. Can affect anyone regardless of age, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status. Commonly found in children under 2 years old and in the elderly

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