Julia’s Story

Five years ago my life changed overnight. I woke up with a headache and over the course of the day I started to twitch. Over the next six months this escalated from very small twitches to full body jerks, sometimes seconds apart and lasting for days at a time. After many doctor and hospital visits, and a few neurologists down the track I was finally diagnosed with Juvenile Myoclonic

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Epilepsy and Memory

Dealing with memory issues is challenging for most people at some point in their lives, and for people with epilepsy it is not unusual. Memory loss can occur because of seizure activity within the brain, which disrupts memory processes, and sometimes because of the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) which can cause drowsiness or attention problems. In most cases AEDs control seizures, which helps improve

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Safe cooking strategies for people with epilepsy

by Stephanie Hunter Safety while cooking The kitchen, with its ovens, burners, and sharp knives is a potentially hazardous area. Adjustments in methods of food preparation, cooking, and clean-up will make the kitchen safer for people with seizures. For example, some people with occasional complex partial seizures choose to complete all their food preparation with food processors and choppers instead of knives, or purchase pre-cut

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Kieran’s Poem

Meet Kieran. Kieran has epilepsy and is also a keen soccer player. He has written two poems to share with you all. Thank you Kieran. Epilepsy is not that bad, It will not make you sad, Do not think of this thing as hate, Treat it like it’s your best mate. Epilepsy is quite cool, It will make you not a fool, Do not go

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Risk Management Planning for Teachers

Epilepsy is a complex condition with many different types of seizures possible. Each individual responds differently to the condition and so it is not possible to provide specific risk management guidelines applicable to all children within a school. Each school therefore needs to develop a series of risk management plans that are suitable for individual children with epilepsy, i.e. each child will likely need to

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Driving and Epilepsy

Driving requires a complex array of neurological functions and skills that involve vision, thinking, attention and judgement, co-ordination, reaction time and motor control. Any of these can be impaired by epilepsy and seizures. People who drive vehicles may present safety concerns for themselves, their passengers and the public. Despite having epilepsy, many people are still able to drive and hold a driver’s licence, but conditions

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Be Empowered

When a person is newly diagnosed with epilepsy there is an adjustment period. Questions are asked, “Why me?”, and a whole range of emotions can be displayed from denial, sadness, grief, or anger. These in turn can affect self-esteem: a person can become fearful of his/her condition, anxious, embarrassed, or even angry. Relationships can suffer, employment potential can be compromised and a person’s ability to

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Safety in the Home

Keeping Safe – Living with Epilepsy The home is the most common place for seizure-related accidents, followed by street and workplace accidents. The following information is designed to help identify the most appropriate safety measures for you. In the bedroom Have a low bed Don’t place the bed against the wall or near other furniture Place protective cushions around the bed Pad sharp-edged furniture Use

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My seizure diary

A seizure diary is an important tool to manage, record and keep track of seizures and epilepsy.  It can be used to keep track of medications, side effects, seizure frequency and for help in identifying potential triggers. We worked together with Seizure Support Northland to develop an easy to use and in depth seizure diary. Please contact Maria if you would like to receive a free copy.

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